Six Steps To LIving Long And Staying Healthy

Healthy LifeCeliac disease is a severe genetic autoimmune disorder, based on the Celiac Illness Foundation, where the ingestion of gluten results in damage within the small gut. A healthy lifestyle leaves you fit, energetic and at reduced risk for disease, based on the choices you make about your daily habits. Good nutrition, daily exercise and adequate sleep are the foundations for continuing good health. Managing stress in positive ways, instead of through smoking or drinking alcohol, reduces wear and tear on your body at the hormonal level. For a longer and more comfortable life, put together your plan for a healthy lifestyle and live up to it.

Meatless Monday is an international movement to help people reduce their meat consumption by 15%. On average, Americans consume 8 ounces of meat per day — 45% more than the USDA recommends. Going meatless one day a week can reduce the risk of chronic preventable conditions like cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity. It can also help limit people’s carbon footprint and save precious resources like fresh water and fossil fuel. Check out featured meatless options at FFC and Nolan’s.

‘Healthy living’ means making changes to your life to develop new habits that improve your health in all these ways. The trend in life expectancy and healthy life expectancy at age 65 has also been upwards in recent decades. Once they reach the age of 65, in 2012 to 2014, males could expect to live an additional 18.8 years and females an additional 21.2 years.

Healthy living involves more than physical health, it also includes emotional or mental health. The following are some ways people can support their mental health and well-being. Foods that don’t expire contain unnatural preservatives, additives, and chemicals that deteriorate your body. Focus instead on fruits, vegetables, lean meats, whole grains, low-fat dairies, and above all, moderation in whatever you eat.

Also, you should avoid secondhand smoke. It can cause lung cancer in non-smokers and is associated with heart disease and asthma attacks,” Prokhorov says. No level of exposure is safe, he warns. This study underscores the difficulty of the obesity problem in the U.S., which persists even as Americans eat more produce and work out more than they used to. There’s obviously work to be done across all four healthy-lifestyle qualifications, but once again, fat proves the toughest nut to crack.