Living A Healthy Life With Chronic Pain

Healthy LifeThe continuing rise of lifestyle-related diseases and chronic disorders means that we need to take a fresh look at health and healthcare, and to remember that prevention is better than cure. Make time in your life for things that are fun. Make a list of activities you like and sure you have at least a little time each day for doing something you enjoy. Consider couples therapy, where feelings and fears can be expressed in a safe manner. Your partner can offer another perspective to your therapist and help you make use of your therapist’s suggestions in your day-to-day life.

If there are things you know are going to be a problem or a challenge, talk to your support person about getting ready to deal with these. For example, if you tend to snack a lot in the afternoon, your support person could suggest rearranging the kitchen cupboard so that healthier foods such as dried fruit, pretzels, or rice crackers are at the front and the unhealthier, fatty foods are stored somewhere more difficult to reach.

Becoming more active is key to combatting obesity and to keeping healthy in general. Encourage your children to take up extracurricular activities that involve exercise: go swimming in summer, take up a sport or go to a dance class. Make family outings healthy too: why not organise a trip to the beach or the park. And here’s another idea: start going on a family walk after dinner instead of flopping in front of television. The key is also in your diet and eating habits: cut out junk and sugary food and avoid eating in front of the TV.

Being healthy can change the way you feel about your whole life. The very point of it is to make you feel good, not to ‘punish your body’. That’s why making sure you reward yourself for developing healthier habits is important. Source: Office for National Statistics life expectancy data for single years. Data for 2016 are provisional and produced by Public Health England.

Admittedly, some benefits may come from weight-loss. Earlier trials from Calerie had included people that were obese as well as those with a healthy body mass index (BMI) of 25 or below, and slimming down would have certainly improved the welfare of the heavier participants. One thing that’s been very clear for a long time is that being overweight or obese is bad for you,” says Roberts. Diseases and disorders previously thought to be age-associated diseases are now popping up in the obese population, she adds.