Healthy Lifestyles Center

Healthy LifeHealth professionals, policy makers and individuals can potentially improve the chances of having a healthier life by addressing the complex interactions between genetics, development, and life events and lifestyles. Don’t drink alcohol. Like caffeine, alcohol is a diuretic. Not only that, but alcohol is repeatedly proven to have negative effects on our body and health — impacting the proper functioning of our brain, liver, lungs, and other major organs. If you drink alcohol regularly, it’s time to cut it out, or at the very least, reduce your consumption.

The Stress Coach includes information on innovative workshops, multimedia webinars, chill apps, how-to videos , Dot Calm , Go Coastal and more stress-relief opportunities. Whether you are an HR manager, executive coach, campus administrator or an individual looking for help, these offerings prevent and reduce stress that impedes focus, leadership, communication, weight loss, smoking cessation, good sex, sound sleep and just about everything else.

Eat what you need. It is better to eat less and in line with your energy needs, rather than eat excessively and work off excess calorie intake through exercise. When you eat excessively, you strain your digestive system by making it digest more food than you need, and when you exercise excessively, you strain your body.

Tobacco use causes an estimated 20% of chronic lung diseases in the U.S., such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema , and causes pneumonia in those with chronic lung disease. The CDC, in 2011, estimated that 90% of deaths from chronic obstructive lung disease ( COPD ) were due to smoking. Rushing into things is not a good way to develop healthy new habits. Pace yourself by making small changes, which are more likely to be kept up. For example, it’s better to start exercising by going for a regular walk, than by suddenly pushing yourself to run 5 km every day.

Start slowly and progress gradually to avoid injury or excessive soreness or fatigue Over time, build up to 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise every day. If you want to live to 100, leaving a little bit of food on your plate may be a good idea. Author Dan Buettner, who studies longevity around the world, found that the oldest Japanese people stop eating when they are feeling only about 80% full.