Healthy Lifestyles Center

Healthy LifeThe continuing rise of lifestyle-related diseases and chronic disorders means that we need to take a fresh look at health and healthcare, and to remember that prevention is better than cure. There is no healthy level of smoking, it harms people of all ages. Scientific evidence shows that if you smoke you face much higher risks of death and or illness from many different cancers, heart disease, stroke, atherosclerosis, emphysema and other respiratory diseases, pregnancy complications and many more conditions. Those who smoke are also less physically fit and have more breathing problems.

Get moving. Aim for at least two-and-a-half hours of moderate aerobic exercise, or an hour and 15 minutes of more vigorous physical activity each week. You also should try strength training at least two days a week. Being healthy is not about being skinny or building up your muscles in a gym, then, it’s about feeling fitter – physically, mentally and emotionally.

Since 2000 to 2002, both life expectancy and healthy life expectancy have increased; the population is now living longer and spending more years in good health. Your risk of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease, is affected by your weight and also where your body fat is stored. People who carry fat around their waist (apple shaped) could be at increased risk of chronic disease.

Any loss in health will, nonetheless, have important second order effects. These will include an altered pattern of resource allocation within the health-care system, as well as wider ranging effects on consumption and production throughout the economy. It is important for policy-makers to be aware of the opportunity cost (i.e. the benefits forgone) of doing too little to prevent ill-health, resulting in the use of limited health resources for the diagnosis, treatment, and management of preventable illness and injuries.

Eat small meals. Choose several small meals over huge meals. This evens out your energy distribution. It’s also better for your stomach because it doesn’t over-stretch from digesting a huge volume of food at one go, which can lead to a hiatus hernia In general, eat when you feel hungry, and stop when you’re full (see tip #24). You don’t need to wait until official meal times before you start eating. Listen to your body and what it tells you.