Healthy Lifestyles

Healthy LifeA healthy lifestyle is one which helps to keep and improve people’s health and well-being. When you were first diagnosed with a mood disorder, you may have felt powerless or afraid. This page will suggest ways to empower yourself and play an active role in the way you live day-to-day with your illness. Regular appointments with your health care provider and attendance at DBSA support group meetings, in addition to the suggestions outlined here, can put a healthy lifestyle within your reach.

Pick a ‘quit date’ and stick to it. Make sure to choose a day where you’re less likely to be under pressure. Plan something nice to occupy your time. Quit Victoria suggests taking a couple of weeks to prepare. Attempt some practice runs – try not to smoke on occasions when you normally would (e.g. work break times and at the pub). Instead, go to places that have no association with smoking. Ditch your lighter and refuse any offers of cigarettes.

Because we know that healthy lifestyles are achieved through nurturing mind, body and spirit, well-being and fitness at the Y goes beyond just working out. In addition to fitness facilities, we provide educational programs to promote healthier decisions, and offer a variety of programs that support physical, intellectual and spiritual strength.

Choose white meat. Cut out red meat. Red meat has been repeatedly established to increase colon cancer risk. 8 9 Cut out red meat (or at the very least, limit your consumption). Substitute red meat with white meat such as chicken and fish. Increase your fish intake which seems protective against cancer. Fish also has healthy fats, a large source of omega-3 fatty acids, protein, and vitamin D.

Avoid salty foods and processed foods like pre-packaged meals, chips, cookies and other treats. Avoidance behavior is another key to healthy living. Below are described some of the major items to avoid if a person is seeking a healthy lifestyle. Use food labels to help you cut down. More than 1.5g of salt per 100g means the food is high in salt. Adults and children over 11 should eat no more than 6g of salt (about a teaspoonful) a day. Younger children should have even less.