Healthy LifeStyle

Healthy LifeA healthy lifestyle is one which helps to keep and improve people’s health and well-being. A general practitioner (GP) is a doctor who is also qualified in general medical practice. GPs are often the first point of contact for someone, of any age, who feels sick or has a health concern. They treat a wide range of medical conditions and can advise you on lowering your risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. To find a GP in your area, visit the link below.

Because we know that healthy lifestyles are achieved through nurturing mind, body and spirit, well-being and fitness at the Y goes beyond just working out. In addition to fitness facilities, we provide educational programs to promote healthier decisions, and offer a variety of programs that support physical, intellectual and spiritual strength.

A good treatment plan is the foundation of a healthy lifestyle. Though it may take time to adjust to medication and therapy, they are your best defenses against symptom recurrence. Everyone has a different physical and emotional makeup, so it often takes time and patience for you and your doctor or mental health professional to find the right treatment strategy for you. It is most important that you communicate your needs to your health care providers and work with them to discover the best possible approach to symptom management. Your loved ones can play an important role in your treatment plan, too. You can help them to help you by making them aware of your medication needs and having them watch for signs of symptom recurrence.

Start slowly and progress gradually to avoid injury or excessive soreness or fatigue Over time, build up to 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise every day. If you want to live to 100, leaving a little bit of food on your plate may be a good idea. Author Dan Buettner, who studies longevity around the world, found that the oldest Japanese people stop eating when they are feeling only about 80% full.

But a predisposition to obesity can be used as a guide to life choices rather than an inevitability. I personally have a genetic history of obesity running through my family, and I practice a flexible form of caloric restriction,” says Susan Roberts a dietary scientist at Tufts University in Boston. I keep my BMI at 22, and have calculated that that requires eating 80% of what I would eat if my BMI was at 30 like every other member of my family.” Roberts stresses that it isn’t hard – she follows her own weight management programme using a tool called iDiet to help her eat less but avoid feeling hungry or deprived of enjoyment. If this wasn’t possible, she adds, she wouldn’t practise calorie restriction.