Healthy Lifestyle Habits

Healthy LifeHealth professionals, policy makers and individuals can potentially improve the chances of having a healthier life by addressing the complex interactions between genetics, development, and life events and lifestyles. Australians have access to a wide range of foods, but most of us need to choose foods and drinks more wisely to help protect our health. Eat a variety of foods daily to get the energy, protein, vitamins, minerals, and fiber you need. Include plenty of vegetables and fruits (preferably raw) and whole grains.

The National Sleep Foundation is dedicated to improving health and well-being through sleep education and advocacy. Founded in 1990 by the leaders in sleep medicine, NSF is the trusted resource for sleep science, healthy sleep habits, and sleep disorders to medical professionals, patients and the public.

In early October, 46 adults and students met at a central location instead of heading straight to school. The excitement was evident as police officers turned on their lights, the local newspaper snapped photos and Clarendon’s first Walk to School Day kicked off with a mayoral proclamation. Two students even rode home on brand new bikes that day. The event spurred a movement in the school and community. The Clarendon Healthy Eating, Active Living (HEAL) coalition worked with the city to calm traffic along roads with paint crosswalks and speed bumps. Later that year, one coalition member stopped to talk to a railroad repairman at work. That same day, the shoulder was widened for youth to cross the railroad tracks safely. With these improvements, now all 2500 residents can walk and bike safely through the area.

See how you measure up. Try out at home the psychological and aptitude tests, the instant weight calculators and lots more. Find out how healthy you really are with just a click of the mouse. Teenagers should get between eight and ten hours of sleep each night to be healthy. Quitting smoking is perhaps the single most important thing you can do for your health—and your life span. A study published in the American Journal of Public Health found that women who quit smoking by age 35 add roughly six to eight years to their lives.

Since 2000 to 2002, both life expectancy and healthy life expectancy have increased; the population is now living longer and spending more years in good health. Your risk of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease, is affected by your weight and also where your body fat is stored. People who carry fat around their waist (apple shaped) could be at increased risk of chronic disease.