Healthy Brains For Healthy Lives

Healthy LifeHealth professionals, policy makers and individuals can potentially improve the chances of having a healthier life by addressing the complex interactions between genetics, development, and life events and lifestyles. Get your micro-nutrients. While macro-nutrients provide our bodies with the bulk energy to function, we need micro-nutrients, i.e., vitamins and minerals, to orchestrate a range of physiological functions. 6 Deficiency in any vitamin or mineral will cause dire effects on our body. Make sure to eat a range of different food to meet your micro-nutrient needs. Eating different food also ensures you have a diverse set of gut flora, which is important for optimal health. Here is a list of micro-nutrients needed by our body.

Drink at least 8 glasses (64 oz.) of water per day, or more if you exercise. If you are taking certain types of medication, you may require even more water. Check with your doctor or pharmacist. HealthierUS Schools Challenge (USDA): A voluntary certification initiative recognizing those schools enrolled in Team Nutrition that have created healthier school environments through promotion of nutrition and physical activity.

LiveLighter LiveLighter is a campaign that encourages adults to lead healthier lifestyles, to make changes to what they eat and drink, and to be more active. LiveLighter includes a range of free tools and resources to support healthy lifestyle change, including recipes and a meal and activity planner.

Healthy life expectancy at birth is an estimate of the average number of years babies born this year would live in a state of ‘good’ general health if mortality levels at each age, and the level of good health at each age, remain constant in the future. Similarly, healthy life expectancy at age 65 is the average number of remaining years a man or woman aged 65 will live in ‘good general health’ if mortality levels and the level of good health at each age beyond 65 remain constant in the future.

Choose white meat. Cut out red meat. Red meat has been repeatedly established to increase colon cancer risk. 8 9 Cut out red meat (or at the very least, limit your consumption). Substitute red meat with white meat such as chicken and fish. Increase your fish intake which seems protective against cancer. Fish also has healthy fats, a large source of omega-3 fatty acids, protein, and vitamin D.