Future

Healthy LifeThe continuing rise of lifestyle-related diseases and chronic disorders means that we need to take a fresh look at health and healthcare, and to remember that prevention is better than cure. Smoking not only cuts your lifespan by affecting your internal organs, but it also ages you on the outside by causing skin damage. Tobacco smoking can give you wrinkles, create pucker lines around your mouth, stain your teeth and fingers, rob your skin of nutrients, break down youth-enhancing collagen and make your skin look grey. It makes you wonder how smoking is often marketed as glamorous and attractive.

It’s never too late to become more physically active. Beginning or resuming exercise at any age will benefit your health. Activity for 30 minutes on most days of the week will provide you with sustainable health benefits. The importance of regular physical activity, types of activity and ways to get you more active are discussed.

Healthy life expectancy at birth is an estimate of the average number of years babies born this year would live in a state of ‘good’ general health if mortality levels at each age, and the level of good health at each age, remain constant in the future. Similarly, healthy life expectancy at age 65 is the average number of remaining years a man or woman aged 65 will live in ‘good general health’ if mortality levels and the level of good health at each age beyond 65 remain constant in the future.

Body Mass Index is used to estimate your total amount of fat. It is only an approximate measure of the best weight for your health. Even before we are born, our health can be affected by the lifestyle choices our mother makes. Studies have shown that if an expectant mother is highly stressed this may impact on their baby, leaving them less able to handle stress later in life.

But overall, meeting more of these qualifications was associated with having fewer risk factors for cardiovascular disease—things like high cholesterol, high white blood cell counts, and high blood pressure. The researchers looked at 13 such biomarkers in total. Being active and having a healthy body-fat percentage were associated with favorable outcomes in nine and 10 of the biomarkers, respectively, while not smoking and eating well were associated with just two and one.