Eight Tips For Healthy Eating

Healthy LifeA healthy lifestyle is one which helps to keep and improve people’s health and well-being. If there are things you know are going to be a problem or a challenge, talk to your support person about getting ready to deal with these. For example, if you tend to snack a lot in the afternoon, your support person could suggest rearranging the kitchen cupboard so that healthier foods such as dried fruit, pretzels, or rice crackers are at the front and the unhealthier, fatty foods are stored somewhere more difficult to reach.

Even if you don’t add salt to your food, you may still be eating too much. About three-quarters of the salt we eat is already in the food we buy, such as breakfast cereals, soups, breads and sauces. Some aspects of our health and vitality are governed by our genes and how our mother behaves during pregnancy, but many lifestyle factors, including fitness, diet and weight all impact on our ability to live a long and healthy life.

But the latest results suggested that significant health benefits can be garnered in an already healthy body – a person who isn’t underweight or obese. That is, someone whose BMI lies between 18.5 and 25. Here are some tips on developing positive habits to help your healthy, new lifestyle. Healthy living is having the opportunity, capability and motivation to act in a way that positively affects your physical and mental well-being. Paying attention to what you eat, being physically active, and learning more about your food and yourself can help you meet your health goals.

You’ve come to the right place! The Sleep, Eat, Exercise campaign is part of the Johns Hopkins Homewood campus’ Healthy Monday program, which uses Monday as the day of the week dedicated to increase health awareness and action. People view Monday as a day for a fresh start and are more likely to starts diets and exercise regimes, quit smoking and schedule doctor’s appointments on Monday than any other day. And a Monday start helps them carry out their healthy intentions for the week. It’s part of the Healthy Monday movement, a national network of health advocacy organizations, government agencies, hospitals, health and fitness facilities, schools, businesses, and individuals are rallying together to make Monday the start of a healthier life.

Once you’ve made the decision to quit, the first couple of weeks can be the hardest. You may feel tense, tired and irritable as your body adjusts. If you feel the urge to ‘light up’ try the simple four Ds – delay acting on the urge to reach for a cigarette, take a few deep breaths, drink water, and do something else until the craving passes.