Arkansas Health Initiative

Healthy LifeCeliac disease is a severe genetic autoimmune disorder, based on the Celiac Illness Foundation, where the ingestion of gluten results in damage within the small gut. It’s never too late to become more physically active. Beginning or resuming exercise at any age will benefit your health. Activity for 30 minutes on most days of the week will provide you with sustainable health benefits. The importance of regular physical activity, types of activity and ways to get you more active are discussed.

Although lacking a neat explanation, calorie restriction is one of the most promising avenues for improving health and how long it lasts in our lives. There was nothing in what we saw that made us think caloric restriction doesn’t work in people,” says Roberts, from the Calerie trial. And, unlike drug-based treatments, it doesn’t come with a long list of possible side effects. Our people were not hungrier, their mood was fine, their sexual function was fine. We looked pretty hard for bad things and didn’t find them,” says Roberts.

Avoid eating a large meal before sleeping to decrease gastroesophageal reflux and weight gain. Get the latest tips on diet, exercise and healthy living. Eat fermentable fibers. When we eat, we aren’t just eating for ourselves — we are eating for the bacteria in our gut too. In order for the good bacteria to flourish, we need fermentable fiber, which is food for the good gut bacteria.

If your support person leads a healthy life, then you can learn from their example or even do things together. For example, if they are a keen gardener, you could help them out or even learn how to grow your own vegetables – getting exercise, fresh air, and free, good food too. Did you know that being overweight or obese are, combined, the fifth leading risk for global deaths? At least 2.8 million adults die each year as a result of being overweight or obese.

The idea that what a person eats influences their health no doubt predates any historical accounts that remain today. But, as is often the case for any scientific discipline, the first detailed accounts come from Ancient Greece. Hippocrates, one of the first physicians to claim diseases were natural and not supernatural, observed that many ailments were associated with gluttony; obese Greeks tended to die younger than slim Greeks, that was clear and written down on papyrus.