5 Ways To A Healthy Lifestyle

Healthy LifeHealthy Life is Australia’s home of ‘feel good’. A recent study found that four bad behaviors—smoking, drinking too much alcohol, not exercising, and not eating enough fruits and veggies—can hustle you into an early grave, and, in effect, age you by as many as 12 years. Lifestyle factors such as having a calcium-rich diet and exercising frequently can keep bones healthy and minimise the risk of fractures. Sunlight exposure is also crucial to up levels of vitamin D.

Write down the main thing you’d like to do to get healthy yourself. It could be giving up smoking, sleeping more regularly, losing a bit of weight, or even just being more physically active. Weight gain is a common side-effect of some medications for Schizophrenia and related conditions, and this can be associated with a number of physical health problems. Working towards a healthy weight and waist size is a good idea for lots of reasons therefore.

Our various work out zones are thoughtfully planned, ergonomically set out and carefully designed to ensure the optimal flow during your exercise routines. Each zone is specifically designed to ensure your body is put through its paces as efficiently as possible in optimal anatomical order from pin-loaded to functional-cables to plate loaded to free weights.

Stick with healthy food from each food group. This means staying away from food high in saturated fats, sodium and added sugars. Eat more whole grains, lean proteins such as chicken or legumes and beans, low-fat or non-fat dairy, and increase your fruits and vegetables. Have healthy snacks. If you’re hungry at work, eat healthy snacks like fruits, vegetable juices, and yogurts. These are nutritional and don’t give you that sugar rush. Have them readily available so that you can get a munch and stop when you have your fill. Stay away from cookies and candy bars.

All content within this story is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. The BBC is not responsible or liable for any diagnosis made by a user based on the content of this site. The BBC is not liable for the contents of any external internet sites listed, nor does it endorse any commercial product or service mentioned or advised on any of the sites. Always consult your own GP if you’re in any way concerned about your health.