45 Tips To Live A Healthier Life

Healthy LifeHealthy Life is Australia’s home of ‘feel good’. Being healthy should be part of your overall lifestyle, not just a New Year’s resolution. Living a healthy lifestyle can help prevent chronic diseases and long-term illnesses. Feeling good about yourself and taking care of your health are important for your self-esteem and self-image. Maintain a healthy lifestyle by doing what is right for your body.

Our body is our temple and we need to take care of it. Do you know that over 70% of Americans are either obese or overweight? 1 That’s insane! Think of your body as your physical shell to take you through life. If you repeatedly abuse it, your shell will wear out quickly. Stress and anxiety can affect anyone at any time and can have consequences on job, family and health. Find out how to sleep better, beat the blues, do more and feel more confident in yourself.

Eat a high calorie breakfast! This will decrease your hunger for the rest of the day as well as speed up your metabolism. Make sure you drink a lot of water, and drink a glass before eating, since you will become full faster. Using smaller plates has a psychological effect which decreases the amount of food you eat. Also, try to limit the amount of sugar and empty calories you take in and eat more lean protein which will keep you full longer and less hungry.

Avoid salty foods and processed foods like pre-packaged meals, chips, cookies and other treats. Avoidance behavior is another key to healthy living. Below are described some of the major items to avoid if a person is seeking a healthy lifestyle. Use food labels to help you cut down. More than 1.5g of salt per 100g means the food is high in salt. Adults and children over 11 should eat no more than 6g of salt (about a teaspoonful) a day. Younger children should have even less.

Start slowly and progress gradually to avoid injury or excessive soreness or fatigue Over time, build up to 30 to 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise every day. If you want to live to 100, leaving a little bit of food on your plate may be a good idea. Author Dan Buettner, who studies longevity around the world, found that the oldest Japanese people stop eating when they are feeling only about 80% full.